Publication

Joining high-level symbolic planning with low-level motion primitives in adaptive HRI: application to dressing assistance

Conference Article

Conference

IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA)

Edition

2018

Pages

3273-3278

File

Download the digital copy of the doc pdf document

Abstract

For a safe and successful daily living assistance, far from the highly controlled environment of a factory, robots should be able to adapt to ever-changing situations. Programming such a robot is a tedious process that requires expert knowledge. An alternative is to rely on a high-level planner, but the generic symbolic representations used are not well suited to particular robot executions. Contrarily, motion primitives encode robot motions in a way that can be easily adapted to different situations. This paper presents a combined framework that exploits the advantages of both approaches. The number of required symbolic states is reduced, as motion primitives provide "smart actions" that take the current state and cope online with variations. Symbolic actions can include interactions (e.g., ask and inform) that are difficult to demonstrate. We show that the proposed framework can adapt to the user preferences (in terms of robot speed and robot verbosity), can readjust the trajectories based on the user movements, and can handle unforeseen situations. Experiments are performed in a shoe-dressing scenario. This scenario is particularly interesting because it involves a sufficient number of actions, and the human-robot interaction requires the handling of user preferences and unexpected reactions.

Categories

intelligent robots, service robots.

Author keywords

Physical Human-Robot Interaction, Learning from Demonstration, Symbolic Task Planning, Shoe fitting

Scientific reference

G. Canal, E. Pignat, G. Alenyà, S. Calinon and C. Torras. Joining high-level symbolic planning with low-level motion primitives in adaptive HRI: application to dressing assistance, 2018 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 2018, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 3273-3278, to appear.